Monthly Archives: January 2015

Thoughts on Money Inspired by Russell Brand’s Revolution

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Chapter 8 of Revolution sees Russell Brand address one of my favourite topics: money as fallacy. It is heartening to hear another speak of this as I spend a lot of time bemused at the fact that so few people think this way. At a recent party (I am not a party-goer, but the host of this particular party, and her family, are so very nice that whenever they extend an invitation I am inclined to accept) I spent a good amount of time talking to someone who didn’t recoil at my suggestion that money is in no way real (most of the people I have tried to have a conversation with have actually, physically recoiled, leaving me feeling that I’m wasting my time pursuing such thoughts with them). What is it about money, and our present ‘global economy,’ that people have such a hard time debunking in their heads? Is it that people don’t question where money came from as an ideological tool (of whatever)? Or is it that we, as a society (speaking Western-industrialized here, but this can extend to many others), spend way too much time and energy, in fact some people do little else, trying to chase down every coin and note (and electronic versions of these) they can lay their hands on? Whatever the reason(s), the only way that money’s dominance will diminish over time is by sparking conversation now. To that end, why not start by asking yourself how the world would look without money (or a monetary system like the one we operate under (an ominous thought in itself, operating ‘under’ money))?

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Action, of sorts, Inspired by Russell Brand’s Message of Revolution

Whilst emptying my email inbox I came across this, as yet, unanswered email sent to Russell Brand, via his management team, in late 2013 – funny how people can confuse my surname with my given name.

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Dear Alexander,

Thanks for your email which I have forward to Russell’s office in the US.

Best
Moira

From: “Alexander, Matthew”
Date: Thursday, 24 October 2013 16:24
To: Moira Bellas
Subject: Russell Brand’s Revolution

Dear Ms Bellas,

I hope that this email will eventually find its way to Russell Brand. I watched with interest the interview that Jeremy Paxman conducted on Newsnight (23rd October 2013) and felt compelled to write to Mr Brand. I do hope that this is not a nuisance to you. The address to Mr Brand is typed below.

Yours sincerely,

Matthew Alexander

 

Dear Mr Brand,

It is refreshing to hear someone of your stature calling for revolution. The interview that Jeremy Paxman conducted was poor (on his behalf) in that his own ignorance and complicity with the present system is all too obvious, and certainly does not represent impartial journalism. Paxman is more at home dealing with ‘buffoons’ like Boris Johnson, a man who is in no way stupid judging by the expense of his education but who is content to ‘act the fool’ because this deflects criticism away from him and his right-wing views. Buffoons like Johnson allow Paxman to ‘play’ at being the serious interviewer. It is no wonder that people ‘glaze over’ and show a lack of interest in politics when Boris Johnson is considered a serious politician, or indeed worthy of the title of Mayor of London.

There is the potential to mobilise the revolutionary message in a way that has never before been possible through the use of social networking and other tools of mass popular culture. The apathy of the people, with regard to present day politics, is connected to the disdain that is shown to them by those career politicians who are more interested in their own concerns than in the concerns of the people they are elected to represent. I see the way forward as a ‘re-imagining’ of politics rather than a revolution, which is a loaded word and offers many an example of past failures with which detractors will then undoubtedly use for their own ends. A re-imagining offers hope of something different, and I think that was the message you were communicating last night.

Paxman’s insistence at putting you on the spot in order to get a handle on the mechanics of the re-imagining is a tactic designed to debunk your message and I thought you negotiated this well – and this is what gives me hope of a new beginning, because people like you who can defend themselves with words and who can deflect the all-too-simple tactic of ‘bash the utopian’ are a thorn in the side of the established order: you are a thorn. It is impossible to think that anyone has all the answers at this stage, as you rightly commented. What is likely to follow is difficulty and hardship, but one that is likely to lead to a better future for humankind – and surely that must be the sole aim of this re-imagining.

I detest poverty. I detest war. I detest hatred and violence. I believe in humanism, where harmony promotes love and understanding. This must be a peaceful re-imagining, a re-imagining that has at its fore the desire to end wrongdoing and unfairness. Money is fallacy. The desire for money, and the accumulation of it, is divisive. There is no need for anyone to be poor when money is viewed in this way. I believe that a vital part of the re-imagining of world politics is to promote the ‘money is fallacy’ message. Without drawing attention to this, money is afforded an almost preternatural status where its very existence is never questioned; and this means that the poor, the starving, the fearful, and the vulnerable remain just that.

If you can continue to use your celebrity status, and that of your acquaintances, to promote the idea of a need for change then I believe there will be a mass ‘awakening;’ but the message must be repetitive and strong from the start, for far too many people are content to numb their minds to the ills of the world via whatever means necessary. I am nobody and no-one, but I am happy to spread the word by whatever means available to me. I come from a poor, working-class background and believe in a better future for all. I hope that these words are passed on to you as I am excited by the prospect of political theorising that has the potential to change lives – and I’m sure there are many of us.

Thank you for the hope you give to humankind.

Yours sincerely,

Matthew Alexander


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