Tag Archives: Brock Turner

Definitely a Survivor, Not a Victim #MeToo #RapeCulture

In the coming weeks, having recently revealed her identity for the first time, Chanel Miller, the survivor of an horrific sexual assault, of which she has no actual memory because she was unconscious at the time, will speak publicly about life following Brock Turner’s decision to sexually assault her instead of helping her (which you’d imagine would be an automatic response at seeing a person unconscious on the ground, but as we know, Brock Turner’s first thoughts were not that he should help but that he should try to remove her clothes and rape her – only stopped by two passers-by who were actually willing to help Chanel Miller in her unconscious state (personally, I don’t think that I’m overdoing it stressing that point)).

There are a number of issues to be raised here, but first and foremost our thoughts must turn to the fact that Chanel Miller had no choice in what happened that night, and that she has had to live with the consequences of Brock Turner’s decision to sexually assault her, and she has lived that form of private hell ever since, and now she is about to relive it all in public, with everyone who wishes to know about such things having access to the most personal details of her life, which will be incredibly stressful at the very least.

And this is where #MeToo (and its earlier incarnation) and awareness of #RapeCulture are key to educating current and future generations in order that people stop doing such terrible things to other people. The ramifications of such acts are long lasting, and forcing ourselves, and others, to think about how a person can dehumanise another person in order to satisfy whatever urge they feel at that moment in time is a step towards ending inhumane behaviour. Chanel Miller should have been helped, not sexually assaulted, and it is to her credit that she is willing to speak up to help others.

As this is the time of year where youngsters start college/university life, many living away from home for the first time, it is important to spread the message that no matter how intoxicated a person may be, and no matter the clothes they wear, and no matter the areas through which they walk, whether alone or accompanied, no one has the right to sexually assault or rape another person. That seems like an obvious statement, and many readers will agree without even flinching, but there are those like the Brock Turner of 2015 (who failed to show remorse for his crime) who will continue to do so unless such behaviour is called out and challenged – shout as loud as possible until it becomes second nature for a person to help rather than harm. Chantel Miller’s voice will be heard, and it will make a difference.

And I haven’t even had time to mention the judge, Aaron Persky (who was eventually recalled).

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To Clarify on @BenShapiro’s thoughts, via @realDailyWire, on @ArianaGrande’s TOW

Here’s the bit from Mr. Shapiro’s article where he connects Ms. Grande’s “bad girls” lyric with “waiv[ing] consent,” just so it’s clear.

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From Mr. Shapiro’s article on The Daily Wire:

This is an actual lyric from “Dangerous Woman”:

Don’t need permission

Made my decision to test my limits…

All girls wanna be like that

Bad girls underneath, like that

This isn’t Grande just speaking for herself. It’s Grande speaking for all women. That’s why she has an audience – she’s not just speaking about her personal experiences or personal desires, she’s making a deliberate case that women generally oppose boundaries, that they’re all “bad girls underneath,” that women generally want to waive consent (emphasis Mr. Shapiro’s).

Looking at the first line – Don’t need permission – this could mean anything, it’s rather vague, and so to hang Ms. Grande out to dry as an objectifier of women is stretching it a bit.

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Onto the second line – Made my decision to test my limits… – again, a bit vague, nothing much to hang your hat on.

The third – All girls wanna be like that – stating a universal viewpoint, but again it’s not clear what all girls want to be like, so…

Line four – Bad girls underneath, like that – apart from the use of “bad” as a modifier for the noun “girls,” there’s nothing here to suggest that Ms. Grande is “making a deliberate case that women generally oppose boundaries,” or that they “generally want to waive consent.” Mr. Shapiro’s is not a piece of objective reporting, it’s personal #RapeCulture informed bias – and he, like Ms. Grande, also has an audience (just saying (double standards, anyone?)).

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Mr. Shapiro’s place in #RapeCulture is clearly not at the levels of a #BrockTurner, but his attitude is as unhelpful and as unwelcome as that of an #AaronPersky – and that can never be a good thing. And as well as Mr. Shapiro’s thoughts on this, what does The Daily Wire @realDailyWire think of such opinions being put forth on its site by its editor-in-chief – happy to promote #RapeCulture?

(And here’s a further link to a site that publishes the entire lyrics of “Dangerous Woman”)


On @ArianaGrande’s Thoughts on the Objectification of Women

It feels like a tiny step forward when an A-list pop star (and not an overt, flying the flag for feminism pop star) is willing to come out to say some stuff about the objectification of women. It is a tiny step because it comes from a person deeply embedded within a system that uses the objectified body of woman as a form of marketing, a tool with which to maximise profit. And it is a tiny step because at 23, Ariana Grande is yet to experience the point at which the objectification of her body ceases to be an issue (and at which point she may, or may not, choose to undergo certain procedures, ensuring a prolonged objectification of her body, paradoxically). However, it seems that Ariana Grande’s recent outburst, vis-à-vis the “not a piece of meat” business, has the potential to mark a new chapter in the History of Stupidity of gender relations.

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A myriad of approaches awaits anyone choosing to engage with such a topic. One might choose to lend one’s support to Ms. Grande, no questions asked, like Ashley Edwards Walker, who views Grande as being “totally right” in her actions and words w/r/t the Mac Miller fan who applauded Mr. Miller for “hitting that.”

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Or, one might take the view that Ms. Grande is complicit in the ongoing objectification of women in popular culture, like Ben Shapiro does when stating that “when Grande isn’t implying that all women are bad girls, she’s participating in the pop music trope of offering herself to the world at large. Her songs aren’t about love with a particular fellow – they’re general propositions.” For Shapiro, Grande is moaning about behaviour that she helps to promote – she’s merely a heteronormative-pop-princess-prostitute in Shapiro’s opinion.

 

Or, one might adopt the @PiersMorgan approach of just shutting down a conversation by simply stating that the person in question is merely pissing and moaning for reasons to do with self-promotion (a marketing stunt). Admittedly, we’re straying slightly, here, because the Morgan stuff has to do with @Madonna and @LadyGaga, but the general approach adopted by Morgan applies equally well to Ariana Grande’s experience of a culture that views women as less than equal to men.

But, and here’s where the story gets a bit less pop-princessy, what if every instance of a young guy growing up thinking that a person like Ariana Grande is a “thing” whose sole purpose is to be “hit” ends up with that guy taking the Brock Turner view of women that if they’re there, they are there to be fucked: whether conscious at the time, or not (excuse the language).

Applauding another man for “hitting that” while the “that” in question (Grande herself) is sitting right next to the man being congratulated is, perhaps, on the lower end of the rape culture spectrum, but it is on the spectrum, and it does speak of a rape culture that seeks to dehumanise women’s bodies in order that the Brock Turners of this world can continue their rapist activities, and that the Aaron Perskys can continue to absolve the Brock Turners of their rapist ways, and that the Commission on Judicial Performance can thus clear the Perskys of any wrong doing in what would otherwise be viewed as either gross incompetence, or just plain bias.

 

So, what next for Grande? Get tagged with the feminist label? Get shut down by her record label? Suffer a backlash like that of a Kesha Sebert type performer? Or, flick the bird to all who would have her shut her pretty little mouth, and keep raging longer, louder, and harder? Let’s hope for the latter.

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Just So Many Reasons to Not Accept the #Lockerroom Excuse

In light of #DonaldTrump’s recent comments, where he attempts to excuse away the vile comments he made about the ways in which he professes to grab females by their genitalia, here are a few reminders of why such talk should not merely be excused as “locker room” banter.

  • Reminder 1: Judge #AaronPersky continues to be lenient in his sentencing of abusive people, such as #BrockTurner. If we excuse such comments, the Aaron Perskys and Brock Turners of the world feel justified in their actions when they should be horrified by them.
  • Reminder 2: The levels of violence aimed at women around the globe, like the news item in Argentina, are far too many to be excused, and so Trump’s comments should not be tolerated, nor should they be excused.
  • Reminder 3: Convicted rapists, such as Brock Turner, simply fade from memory as news items move on. Unfortunately, the survivors of such crimes do not get to have their memory of events fade away so simply, and therefore we must continue to hold at the forefront of our minds the horrendous things that humans do to one another when they feel they can justify their actions away as “locker room” behaviour, for example (a very basic internet search of “Brock Turner update” brings back items that date no later than early September 2016 – so his story of raping an unconscious person fades away from public view).

(Lucia Perez (pictured above) died as a result of some person/s justifying their behaviour to themselves – it’s never right to treat another human in this manner, nor is it okay to excuse their behaviour) The preceding article is extremely disturbing – all the more reason to read it and contribute to ending such behaviour, however you can.


Petition @Stanford University #BrockTurner

Hello,

I just signed the petition, “Letter to Stanford University in Support of Survivor of Brock Turner case.”

I think this is important and things clearly need to change with respect to sexual assaults and rapes on and around campuses. Will you sign it too, please?
Here’s the link:
https://www.change.org/p/letter-to-stanford-university-in-support-of-survivor-of-brock-turner-case

And here’s just one of the problems:


Thank you 


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