Tag Archives: technology

Pondering the #immersivestorytelling Symposium @ljmu

Not a direction the #immersivestorytelling symposium flagged up, per se, but one that springs to mind of being of interest due to references of “doing things in different ways” and Future Thinking, is the thought of relying less on traditional, conventional, old-world models connected with funding, finance, and commercial concerns. If wonderful new applications and uses of technology (AR, VR, XR, AI) are just around the corner, and it seems they are, and we don’t yet know just how much of an impact they will have on human evolution, which undoubtedly they will, then why would we shackle their development by confining them to purely profit driven activities? Won’t pressures of profit for shareholders, and the wish for ever more growth, etc., lead us back to the same old results, where exploiting an idea for profit is the sole motivating factor (meaning that the full potential of an idea may not be reached if it is not commercially viable, for example)?

A term I particularly liked was Julia Scott-Stevenson’s “seeking preferred futures,” and at this point in human evolution shouldn’t we all be attempting such a thing? Phil Charnock’s reference to the Whole Earth Catalog and the idea of democratised knowledge and access to information speaks to new ways of future thinking that we’ve been theorising about but have not yet been bold enough to bring into actuality. Perhaps these evolving technologies could be the spark that ignites such a flame…

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Cassettes & @PeterDoherty – How Very 1970s

Following on from the post, “If Technology is All That, What’s Going On With the #Vinyl Revival?,” there follows the news that new music is being put down on cassette format. Now, you’d have thought that cassette was also deader than dead, as was previously thought of our old friend vinyl, yet here we are with none other than Peter Doherty producing a cassette version of his new solo album, Hamburg Demonstrations.

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If this trend carries on, where do we end up, when at one end of the spectrum we have the Musk/TESLA guy banging on about the colonisation of Mars (and let’s hope to goodness that he’s using colonialism in a progressive way), and at the other we have cassette players coming back into vogue?


If #Technology is All That, What’s Going On With the #Vinyl Revival?

A simple question.

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MP3. iPods. Streaming. Spotify. Apple Music.

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Yet with all this, and more, vinyl seems to be growing in popularity amongst young and old alike.

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So, how is it that a way of listening to music that pretty much died out entirely – we’re not talking eBooks versus physical books here, where books never really went away – is now flooding back into shops? And why is it so expensive, compared to all the music that haunts its way, as if by magic, through the ethereal cloud that envelops us?


“…it’s always easier to get forgiveness than permission.”

…it’s always easier to get forgiveness than permission.

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In Banksy’s letter to the children of Bridge Farm Primary School, Bristol, the above words appear as a sentiment that expresses the need to sometimes just do things rather than wait around forever for permission before doing so. Now, obviously, there are limits that all decent people would expect to impose upon themselves before doing things that might just harm others, but looking past this to the kind of mentality that seeks its own liberation from restrictive practices seems to speak of the possibilities that are now opening up as a direct result of technological advances.

 

A recent example of this kind of thinking, witnessed only y/day, is that of design-led technology company Red Ninja Studios (@RedNinjaStudios), based in Liverpool’s Baltic Triangle. Red Ninja held a hackathon with a non-profit organisation whose business is concerned with the care of older people in the community. The optimism shared by all at the event that technology could indeed improve the lives of many older people was boosted by the attitudes of those involved with Red Ninja Studios, where the company ethos appears to be, pretty much: “Make Things Happen.”

 

An anecdote shared y/day w/r/t “making things happen” in the NHS involved new pieces of technology that take so long to be approved for use that by the time they are, they are less relevant and potentially even obsolete. Similar anecdotes exist w/r/t other huge organisations. Perhaps a bit more Banksy/Red Ninja philosophy is required?

 


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